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“Virtual Nubia” is a website allowing us to travel to medieval buildings discovered by archaeologists in Nubian desert through a screen of a computer. Nubia is a land located in the Middle Nile Valley on the territory of modern Sudan and Egypt.

“Virtual Nubia” presents reconstructed buildings discovered by archaeologist working under the auspices of the Polish Centre of the Mediterranean Archaeology of the University of Warsaw. Polish researchers have a great experience in an exploration of medieval Nubia. Their work started in Faras cathedral, famous of its magnificent wall paintings presented in national museums in Warsaw and Khartoum. Since then many more discoveries came.


Virtual tour

Our models can be viewed using a VR headset; if you don’t have one, you can also explore them on your computer.

Virtual tour: two modes of navigation through the monasteries are available. You can switch between them by clicking a gear wheel in the bottom right corner: Settings>Navigation. You can also switch the full screen mode in clicking arrows in the bottom right corner.

The Orbit Mode allows you to rotate the model in every direction with finger drag move. You can zoom on the object by scrolling the mouse wheel. On Sketchfab it is not possible to limit your ability to move around, so be careful not to go through walls.

In the First Person Mode, you can move forward and backward through the space using arrows as well as look around by dragging the image with the mouse (as in the Orbit Mode). You can adjust the speed of your movement on the mouse wheel.

Guided tour: In order to move to particular parts and interiors of the monastery, click “plus” and a name of rooms you want to visit. It opens a page with model of that part of the monastery and its interior which you can navigate in a way described above. A page would also contain some information and a photo of the actual archaeological remains of the reconstructed building. Some models also contain annotations which you can click to obtain more information related to a particular part of a model.


Our reconstructions